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Full Coverage: Algebraic Fractions

GCSE question compilation which aims to cover all types of questions that might be seen on the topic of algebraic fractions. Students can complete this set of questions interactively on the DFM Homework Platform. Also contains answers.

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

This article is about the breakfast cereal known as "Weetabix". For the company which produces it, see Weetabix Limited. Not to be confused with Weet-Bix. Weetabix logo Weetabix is a whole grain wheat breakfast cereal produced by Weetabix Limited in the United Kingdom. It comes in the form of palm-sized (approx. 9.5 cm × 5.0 cm or 4" × 2") rounded rectangle-shaped biscuits. Variants include organic and Weetabix Minis (bite-sized) versions.[1] The UK cereal is manufactured in Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, and exported to over 80 countries.[2] Weetabix for Canada and the United States is manufactured in Cobourg, Ontario, in both organic and conventional versions. Weetabix is made from whole grain wheat and the version sold in the United Kingdom has 3.8 g of fibre in a 37.5 g serving (2 biscuits) (10.1% by weight).[3] The product sold in Canada and the U.S. has 4 grams of fibre in a 35 g serving (11.4% by weight).[4] Contents 1 History 2 Advertising 3 Variants 3.1 Weetabix Minis 3.2 Organic 3.3 Weetabix Chocolate 3.4 Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize 3.5 Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup 3.6 Weetabix Banana 3.7 Weetabix Protein 4 Oatibix 4.1 Related products 5 See also 6 References 7 External links History Main article: History of Weet-Bix Two dry Weetabix in a bowl Produced in the UK since 1932, Weetabix is the British version of the original Australian Weet-Bix. Both Weet-Bix and Weetabix were invented by Bennison Osborne, an Australian. Weet-Bix was introduced in Australia through the company “Grain Products Limited” in the mid-1920s, with funding from businessman Arthur Shannon and marketing assistance from Osborne’s New Zealand friend Malcolm Macfarlane. To both Osborne’s and Macfarlane’s disappointment, Grain Products sold both its Australian company (in 1928) and then its New Zealand company (in 1930), to the Sanitarium Health Foods Company. Osborne and Macfarlane then went to South Africa where Arthur Shannon, the owner of Grain Products, funded another Weet-Bix factory. While in South Africa, Osborne modified his Weet-Bix recipe and with Macfarlane, obtained private funding and began the development of a new company, The British and African Cereal Company Limited, naming the new company's product, Weetabix. The company commenced business in England in 1932 in an unused gristmill at Burton Latimer, near Kettering.[5] In 1936, the name of the company was changed to Weetabix Limited. Weet-Bix is currently marketed in Australasia by Sanitarium and South Africa by Bokomo. The product was introduced to Canada in 1967, when Weetabix Limited began exporting the product to Canada. The United States followed in 1968.[6] On May 3, 2012 Bright Food announced it was taking a 60% stake in Weetabix in a deal that values the company at £1.2bn.[7] Baring Private Equity Asia acquired the remaining 40% from Lion Capital in 2015. On 18 April 2017, it was announced that Post Holding would buy the company from Bright Food.[8] Advertising In British advertising in the 1980s, Weetabix anthropomorphized the biscuits, representing a group of 'street-wise' young teens, beginning as 'skinheads'. Their appearances on the packaging and associated publicity featured catch phrases such as "titchy breakfast cereals" to describe rivals, with the response "Neet Weet Mate", "OK!". The lead Weetabix was voiced by Bob Hoskins.[9] During the 1990s, the brand was advertised with the slogan "Have you had your Weetabix?', based on the idea that someone who had eaten Weetabix would be filled with unbeatable strength and energy, causing those who oppose them to flee out of self-preservation. This was used to humorous effect in a variety of adverts re-imagining the outcome of fairy tales and historic events. In 2017, the campaign was reintroduced, with a reference to the English fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk. The giant states: “Fee fi fo fum, I smell the blood of an English man”, with the boy responding: “Fee fi fo fix, I’ve just had my Weetabix”, resulting in the giant quickly leaving the room.[10] Weetabix was the title sponsor of the Women's British Open golf tournament for two decades, from 1987 until 2006. It became a women's major golf championship in 2001. In 1981, Weetabix aired an advertisement entitled 1, which showed a big "1" as a crop circle-like figure in a field. Variants Weetabix Minis Weetabix Minis are a sweeter 'bite-size' version of the standard Weetabix biscuits, with various additions depending upon the variety: 'chocolate', 'banana', 'fruit & nut' and 'honey & nut'. Outside of the UK, the cereal has been relaunched and renamed at least twice in a relatively short period of time following their launch. Previously, they were known as Fruitibix, Bananabix and Chocobix (depending upon the additions), then as Minibix. Organic Organic versions of Weetabix are sold in various countries. Weetabix Chocolate Weetabix launched a chocolate-powder infused version of the original Weetabix in the UK in July 2010 in a 24 pack size. Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize A smaller-sized Weetabix biscuit with cocoa and chocolate chips. Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup A sweeter form of the Weetabix biscuit which is baked with golden syrup. Weetabix Banana A banana-flavoured version of Weetabix. Weetabix Protein A version with added wheat gluten protein granules was introduced in the UK in April 2016, available in three forms, the standard biscuit shapes, as well as regular and chocolate flavour "Crunch" pipe shapes. Oatibix Oatibix and milk, with cereal box Oatibix is a breakfast cereal that was introduced in the United Kingdom in August 2006. It was invented by Weetabix Limited. It is similar to Weetabix, but is based on whole grain oats instead of wheat. Related products In April 2007, Weetabix Limited also introduced Oatiflakes, which is also released with Raisin, Cranberry and Blackcurrant varieties. Oatibix Bites are a smaller "bite-sized" version of Oatibix that can be poured into a bowl, similar to Weetabix Minis, and more like a traditional breakfast cereal. It is available as Oatibix Bites, Oatibix Bites with Sultana and Apple and Oatibix Bites with Cranberry varieties. See also Weet-Bix Frosted Mini-Wheats - sugar-coated wheat pellets Shredded Wheat - another wheat-based biscuit cereal. Ruskets - a similar product, formerly manufactured by Loma Linda Foods in Riverside, California. References "Weetabix Range". Weetabix Ltd. Retrieved 2007-07-02. there's now an even bigger range of Weetabix cereals for you to try, including Weetabix, Weetabix Gold, Weetabix Minis and Weetabix Organic. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix Breakfast Cereal". weetabixusa.com. Retrieved 10 March 2013. Industrial history from the air by Kenneth Hudson "Weetabix Ltd - About Us". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix bought by China's Bright Food". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-05-03. "Weetabix to be sold to US company". BBC News. 18 April 2017. Chris Fillm (2002). "Marketing Communications: Contexts, Strategies, and Applications". p. 516. Financial Times Prentice Hall "Weetabix launches £10m campaign with Jack and the Beanstalk ad". Talking Retail. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Weetabix. Weetabix Weetabix Food Company Categories: Weetabix cerealsFood brands of the United KingdomProducts introduced in 1936Wheat Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inArticleTalkReadEditView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page In other projects Wikimedia Commons Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages Deutsch Scots Suomi Svenska Türkçe Edit links This page was last edited on 9 May 2019, at 14:04 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.This article is about the breakfast cereal known as "Weetabix". For the company which produces it, see Weetabix Limited. Not to be confused with Weet-Bix. Weetabix logo Weetabix is a whole grain wheat breakfast cereal produced by Weetabix Limited in the United Kingdom. It comes in the form of palm-sized (approx. 9.5 cm × 5.0 cm or 4" × 2") rounded rectangle-shaped biscuits. Variants include organic and Weetabix Minis (bite-sized) versions.[1] The UK cereal is manufactured in Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, and exported to over 80 countries.[2] Weetabix for Canada and the United States is manufactured in Cobourg, Ontario, in both organic and conventional versions. Weetabix is made from whole grain wheat and the version sold in the United Kingdom has 3.8 g of fibre in a 37.5 g serving (2 biscuits) (10.1% by weight).[3] The product sold in Canada and the U.S. has 4 grams of fibre in a 35 g serving (11.4% by weight).[4] Contents 1 History 2 Advertising 3 Variants 3.1 Weetabix Minis 3.2 Organic 3.3 Weetabix Chocolate 3.4 Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize 3.5 Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup 3.6 Weetabix Banana 3.7 Weetabix Protein 4 Oatibix 4.1 Related products 5 See also 6 References 7 External links History Main article: History of Weet-Bix Two dry Weetabix in a bowl Produced in the UK since 1932, Weetabix is the British version of the original Australian Weet-Bix. Both Weet-Bix and Weetabix were invented by Bennison Osborne, an Australian. Weet-Bix was introduced in Australia through the company “Grain Products Limited” in the mid-1920s, with funding from businessman Arthur Shannon and marketing assistance from Osborne’s New Zealand friend Malcolm Macfarlane. To both Osborne’s and Macfarlane’s disappointment, Grain Products sold both its Australian company (in 1928) and then its New Zealand company (in 1930), to the Sanitarium Health Foods Company. Osborne and Macfarlane then went to South Africa where Arthur Shannon, the owner of Grain Products, funded another Weet-Bix factory. While in South Africa, Osborne modified his Weet-Bix recipe and with Macfarlane, obtained private funding and began the development of a new company, The British and African Cereal Company Limited, naming the new company's product, Weetabix. The company commenced business in England in 1932 in an unused gristmill at Burton Latimer, near Kettering.[5] In 1936, the name of the company was changed to Weetabix Limited. Weet-Bix is currently marketed in Australasia by Sanitarium and South Africa by Bokomo. The product was introduced to Canada in 1967, when Weetabix Limited began exporting the product to Canada. The United States followed in 1968.[6] On May 3, 2012 Bright Food announced it was taking a 60% stake in Weetabix in a deal that values the company at £1.2bn.[7] Baring Private Equity Asia acquired the remaining 40% from Lion Capital in 2015. On 18 April 2017, it was announced that Post Holding would buy the company from Bright Food.[8] Advertising In British advertising in the 1980s, Weetabix anthropomorphized the biscuits, representing a group of 'street-wise' young teens, beginning as 'skinheads'. Their appearances on the packaging and associated publicity featured catch phrases such as "titchy breakfast cereals" to describe rivals, with the response "Neet Weet Mate", "OK!". The lead Weetabix was voiced by Bob Hoskins.[9] During the 1990s, the brand was advertised with the slogan "Have you had your Weetabix?', based on the idea that someone who had eaten Weetabix would be filled with unbeatable strength and energy, causing those who oppose them to flee out of self-preservation. This was used to humorous effect in a variety of adverts re-imagining the outcome of fairy tales and historic events. In 2017, the campaign was reintroduced, with a reference to the English fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk. The giant states: “Fee fi fo fum, I smell the blood of an English man”, with the boy responding: “Fee fi fo fix, I’ve just had my Weetabix”, resulting in the giant quickly leaving the room.[10] Weetabix was the title sponsor of the Women's British Open golf tournament for two decades, from 1987 until 2006. It became a women's major golf championship in 2001. In 1981, Weetabix aired an advertisement entitled 1, which showed a big "1" as a crop circle-like figure in a field. Variants Weetabix Minis Weetabix Minis are a sweeter 'bite-size' version of the standard Weetabix biscuits, with various additions depending upon the variety: 'chocolate', 'banana', 'fruit & nut' and 'honey & nut'. Outside of the UK, the cereal has been relaunched and renamed at least twice in a relatively short period of time following their launch. Previously, they were known as Fruitibix, Bananabix and Chocobix (depending upon the additions), then as Minibix. Organic Organic versions of Weetabix are sold in various countries. Weetabix Chocolate Weetabix launched a chocolate-powder infused version of the original Weetabix in the UK in July 2010 in a 24 pack size. Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize A smaller-sized Weetabix biscuit with cocoa and chocolate chips. Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup A sweeter form of the Weetabix biscuit which is baked with golden syrup. Weetabix Banana A banana-flavoured version of Weetabix. Weetabix Protein A version with added wheat gluten protein granules was introduced in the UK in April 2016, available in three forms, the standard biscuit shapes, as well as regular and chocolate flavour "Crunch" pipe shapes. Oatibix Oatibix and milk, with cereal box Oatibix is a breakfast cereal that was introduced in the United Kingdom in August 2006. It was invented by Weetabix Limited. It is similar to Weetabix, but is based on whole grain oats instead of wheat. Related products In April 2007, Weetabix Limited also introduced Oatiflakes, which is also released with Raisin, Cranberry and Blackcurrant varieties. Oatibix Bites are a smaller "bite-sized" version of Oatibix that can be poured into a bowl, similar to Weetabix Minis, and more like a traditional breakfast cereal. It is available as Oatibix Bites, Oatibix Bites with Sultana and Apple and Oatibix Bites with Cranberry varieties. See also Weet-Bix Frosted Mini-Wheats - sugar-coated wheat pellets Shredded Wheat - another wheat-based biscuit cereal. Ruskets - a similar product, formerly manufactured by Loma Linda Foods in Riverside, California. References "Weetabix Range". Weetabix Ltd. Retrieved 2007-07-02. there's now an even bigger range of Weetabix cereals for you to try, including Weetabix, Weetabix Gold, Weetabix Minis and Weetabix Organic. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix Breakfast Cereal". weetabixusa.com. Retrieved 10 March 2013. Industrial history from the air by Kenneth Hudson "Weetabix Ltd - About Us". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix bought by China's Bright Food". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-05-03. "Weetabix to be sold to US company". BBC News. 18 April 2017. Chris Fillm (2002). "Marketing Communications: Contexts, Strategies, and Applications". p. 516. Financial Times Prentice Hall "Weetabix launches £10m campaign with Jack and the Beanstalk ad". Talking Retail. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Weetabix. Weetabix Weetabix Food Company Categories: Weetabix cerealsFood brands of the United KingdomProducts introduced in 1936Wheat Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inArticleTalkReadEditView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page In other projects Wikimedia Commons Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages Deutsch Scots Suomi Svenska Türkçe Edit links This page was last edited on 9 May 2019, at 14:04 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.This article is about the breakfast cereal known as "Weetabix". For the company which produces it, see Weetabix Limited. Not to be confused with Weet-Bix. Weetabix logo Weetabix is a whole grain wheat breakfast cereal produced by Weetabix Limited in the United Kingdom. It comes in the form of palm-sized (approx. 9.5 cm × 5.0 cm or 4" × 2") rounded rectangle-shaped biscuits. Variants include organic and Weetabix Minis (bite-sized) versions.[1] The UK cereal is manufactured in Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, and exported to over 80 countries.[2] Weetabix for Canada and the United States is manufactured in Cobourg, Ontario, in both organic and conventional versions. Weetabix is made from whole grain wheat and the version sold in the United Kingdom has 3.8 g of fibre in a 37.5 g serving (2 biscuits) (10.1% by weight).[3] The product sold in Canada and the U.S. has 4 grams of fibre in a 35 g serving (11.4% by weight).[4] Contents 1 History 2 Advertising 3 Variants 3.1 Weetabix Minis 3.2 Organic 3.3 Weetabix Chocolate 3.4 Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize 3.5 Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup 3.6 Weetabix Banana 3.7 Weetabix Protein 4 Oatibix 4.1 Related products 5 See also 6 References 7 External links History Main article: History of Weet-Bix Two dry Weetabix in a bowl Produced in the UK since 1932, Weetabix is the British version of the original Australian Weet-Bix. Both Weet-Bix and Weetabix were invented by Bennison Osborne, an Australian. Weet-Bix was introduced in Australia through the company “Grain Products Limited” in the mid-1920s, with funding from businessman Arthur Shannon and marketing assistance from Osborne’s New Zealand friend Malcolm Macfarlane. To both Osborne’s and Macfarlane’s disappointment, Grain Products sold both its Australian company (in 1928) and then its New Zealand company (in 1930), to the Sanitarium Health Foods Company. Osborne and Macfarlane then went to South Africa where Arthur Shannon, the owner of Grain Products, funded another Weet-Bix factory. While in South Africa, Osborne modified his Weet-Bix recipe and with Macfarlane, obtained private funding and began the development of a new company, The British and African Cereal Company Limited, naming the new company's product, Weetabix. The company commenced business in England in 1932 in an unused gristmill at Burton Latimer, near Kettering.[5] In 1936, the name of the company was changed to Weetabix Limited. Weet-Bix is currently marketed in Australasia by Sanitarium and South Africa by Bokomo. The product was introduced to Canada in 1967, when Weetabix Limited began exporting the product to Canada. The United States followed in 1968.[6] On May 3, 2012 Bright Food announced it was taking a 60% stake in Weetabix in a deal that values the company at £1.2bn.[7] Baring Private Equity Asia acquired the remaining 40% from Lion Capital in 2015. On 18 April 2017, it was announced that Post Holding would buy the company from Bright Food.[8] Advertising In British advertising in the 1980s, Weetabix anthropomorphized the biscuits, representing a group of 'street-wise' young teens, beginning as 'skinheads'. Their appearances on the packaging and associated publicity featured catch phrases such as "titchy breakfast cereals" to describe rivals, with the response "Neet Weet Mate", "OK!". The lead Weetabix was voiced by Bob Hoskins.[9] During the 1990s, the brand was advertised with the slogan "Have you had your Weetabix?', based on the idea that someone who had eaten Weetabix would be filled with unbeatable strength and energy, causing those who oppose them to flee out of self-preservation. This was used to humorous effect in a variety of adverts re-imagining the outcome of fairy tales and historic events. In 2017, the campaign was reintroduced, with a reference to the English fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk. The giant states: “Fee fi fo fum, I smell the blood of an English man”, with the boy responding: “Fee fi fo fix, I’ve just had my Weetabix”, resulting in the giant quickly leaving the room.[10] Weetabix was the title sponsor of the Women's British Open golf tournament for two decades, from 1987 until 2006. It became a women's major golf championship in 2001. In 1981, Weetabix aired an advertisement entitled 1, which showed a big "1" as a crop circle-like figure in a field. Variants Weetabix Minis Weetabix Minis are a sweeter 'bite-size' version of the standard Weetabix biscuits, with various additions depending upon the variety: 'chocolate', 'banana', 'fruit & nut' and 'honey & nut'. Outside of the UK, the cereal has been relaunched and renamed at least twice in a relatively short period of time following their launch. Previously, they were known as Fruitibix, Bananabix and Chocobix (depending upon the additions), then as Minibix. Organic Organic versions of Weetabix are sold in various countries. Weetabix Chocolate Weetabix launched a chocolate-powder infused version of the original Weetabix in the UK in July 2010 in a 24 pack size. Weetabix Chocolate Spoonsize A smaller-sized Weetabix biscuit with cocoa and chocolate chips. Weetabix Baked with Golden Syrup A sweeter form of the Weetabix biscuit which is baked with golden syrup. Weetabix Banana A banana-flavoured version of Weetabix. Weetabix Protein A version with added wheat gluten protein granules was introduced in the UK in April 2016, available in three forms, the standard biscuit shapes, as well as regular and chocolate flavour "Crunch" pipe shapes. Oatibix Oatibix and milk, with cereal box Oatibix is a breakfast cereal that was introduced in the United Kingdom in August 2006. It was invented by Weetabix Limited. It is similar to Weetabix, but is based on whole grain oats instead of wheat. Related products In April 2007, Weetabix Limited also introduced Oatiflakes, which is also released with Raisin, Cranberry and Blackcurrant varieties. Oatibix Bites are a smaller "bite-sized" version of Oatibix that can be poured into a bowl, similar to Weetabix Minis, and more like a traditional breakfast cereal. It is available as Oatibix Bites, Oatibix Bites with Sultana and Apple and Oatibix Bites with Cranberry varieties. See also Weet-Bix Frosted Mini-Wheats - sugar-coated wheat pellets Shredded Wheat - another wheat-based biscuit cereal. Ruskets - a similar product, formerly manufactured by Loma Linda Foods in Riverside, California. References "Weetabix Range". Weetabix Ltd. Retrieved 2007-07-02. there's now an even bigger range of Weetabix cereals for you to try, including Weetabix, Weetabix Gold, Weetabix Minis and Weetabix Organic. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "The Weetabix Food Company". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix Breakfast Cereal". weetabixusa.com. Retrieved 10 March 2013. Industrial history from the air by Kenneth Hudson "Weetabix Ltd - About Us". Weetabix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-06-08. "Weetabix bought by China's Bright Food". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-05-03. "Weetabix to be sold to US company". BBC News. 18 April 2017. Chris Fillm (2002). "Marketing Communications: Contexts, Strategies, and Applications". p. 516. Financial Times Prentice Hall "Weetabix launches £10m campaign with Jack and the Beanstalk ad". Talking Retail. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Weetabix. Weetabix Weetabix Food Company Categories: Weetabix cerealsFood brands of the United KingdomProducts introduced in 1936Wheat Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inArticleTalkReadEditView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page In other projects Wikimedia Commons Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages Deutsch Scots Suomi Svenska Türkçe Edit links This page was last edited on 9 May 2019, at 14:04 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

S Smith

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

00,000 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search "100000" redirects here. For other uses, see 100000 (disambiguation). "999999" redirects here. For the string of nines in pi, see Six nines in pi. ? 99999 100000 100001 ? List of numbers — Integers ? 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 Cardinal one hundred thousand Ordinal 100000th (one hundred thousandth) Factorization 25× 55 Greek numeral {\displaystyle {\stackrel {\iota }{\mathrm {M} }}} {\displaystyle {\stackrel {\iota }{\mathrm {M} }}} Roman numeral C Unicode symbol(s) ? Binary 110000110101000002 Ternary 120020112013 Quaternary 1201222004 Quinary 112000005 Senary 20505446 Octal 3032408 Duodecimal 49A5412 Hexadecimal 186A016 Vigesimal CA0020 Base 36 255S36 100,000 (one hundred thousand) is the natural number following 99,999 and preceding 100,001. In scientific notation, it is written as 105. Contents 1 Terms for 100000 2 Values of 100000 3 Selected 6-digit numbers (100,001–999,999) 3.1 100,001 to 199,999 3.1.1 100,001 to 109,999 3.1.2 110,000 to 119,999 3.1.3 120,000 to 129,999 3.1.4 130,000 to 139,999 3.1.5 140,000 to 149,999 3.1.6 150,000 to 159,999 3.1.7 160,000 to 169,999 3.1.8 170,000 to 179,999 3.1.9 180,000 to 189,999 3.1.10 190,000 to 199,999 3.2 200,000 to 299,999 3.3 300,000 to 399,999 3.4 400,000 to 499,999 3.5 500,000 to 599,999 3.6 600,000 to 699,999 3.7 700,000 to 799,999 3.8 800,000 to 899,999 3.9 900,000 to 999,999 4 References Terms for 100000 In India, Pakistan and South Asia, one hundred thousand is called a lakh, and is written as 1,00,000. The Thai, Lao, Khmer and Vietnamese languages also have separate words for this number: ???, ???, ??? [saen] and ?c respectively. No other major language has a special word for this number, preferring to refer to it as a multiple of smaller numbers.[citation needed] In Cyrillic numerals, it is known as the legion (??????): Legion-1000000-Cyrillic.jpg or ???????.jpg. Values of 100000 In astronomy, 100,000 metres, 100 kilometres, or 100 km (62 miles) is the altitude at which the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) defines spaceflight to begin. In the Irish Language, céad míle fáilte (pronounced: Irish pronunciation: [ce?d?? ?m?i?l?? ?f?a?l?t??]) is a popular greeting meaning "A Hundred Thousand Welcomes". Selected 6-digit numbers (100,001–999,999) 100,001 to 199,999 100,001 to 109,999 100,003 – smallest 6-digit prime number[1] 100,255 – Friedman number[2] 101,101 – smallest palindromic Carmichael number 101,723 – smallest prime number whose square is a pandigital number containing each digit from 0 to 9 102,564 – The smallest parasitic number 103,680 – highly totient number[3] 103,769 – the number of combinatorial types of 5-dimensional parallelohedra 103,823 – 473, nice Friedman number (?1 + 0 + 3×8×2)3 104,723 – the 9,999th prime number 104,729 – the 10,000th prime number 104,869 – the smallest prime number containing every non-prime digit. 104,976 – 184, 3-smooth number 105,664 – harmonic divisor number[4] 109,376 - 1-automorphic number[5] 110,000 to 119,999 110,880 – highly composite number[6] 111,111 – repunit 111,777 – smallest natural number requiring 17 syllables in American English, 19 in British English 113,634 – Motzkin number for n = 14[7] 114,689 – prime factor of F12 115,975 – Bell number[8] 116,281 – 3412, square number, centered decagonal number, 18-gon number 117,067 – first prime vampire number 117,649 – 76 117,800 – harmonic divisor number[4] 120,000 to 129,999 120,284 – Keith number[9] 120,960 – highly totient number[3] 121,393 – Fibonacci number[10] 124,000 – number of Islamic prophets 127,777 – smallest natural number requiring 18 syllables in American English, 20 in British English 127,912 – Wedderburn–Etherington number[11] 128,981 – Starts the first prime gap sequence of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 129,106 – Keith number[9] 130,000 to 139,999 130,321 – 194 131,071 – Mersenne prime[12] 131,072 – 217 131,361 – Leyland number[13] 134,340 – Pluto's minor planet designation 135,137 – Markov number[14] 140,000 to 149,999 142,129 – 3772, square number, dodecagonal number 142,857 – Kaprekar number, Harshad number smallest cyclic number in decimal. 144,000 – number with religious significance 147,640 – Keith number[9] 148,149 – Kaprekar number[15] 150,000 to 159,999 156,146 – Keith number[9] 160,000 to 169,999 160,000 – 204 161,051 – 115 161,280 – highly totient number[3] 166,320 – highly composite number[6] 167,400 – harmonic divisor number[4] 170,000 to 179,999 173,600 – harmonic divisor number[4] 174,680 – Keith number[9] 174,763 – Wagstaff prime[16] 177,147 – 311 177,777 – smallest natural number requiring 19 syllables in American English, 21 in British English 178,478 – Leyland number[13] 180,000 to 189,999 181,440 – highly totient number[3] 181,819 – Kaprekar number[15] 183,186 – Keith number[9] 187,110 – Kaprekar number[15] 190,000 to 199,999 195,025 – Pell number,[17] Markov number[14] 196,418 – Fibonacci number,[10] Markov number[14] 196,560 – the kissing number in 24 dimensions 196,883 – the dimension of the smallest nontrivial irreducible representation of the Monster group 196,884 – the coefficient of q in the Fourier series expansion of the j-invariant. The adjacency of 196883 and 196884 was important in suggesting monstrous moonshine. 200,000 to 299,999 206,265 – number of arc seconds in a radian (see also parsec) 207,360 – highly totient number[3] 208,012 – Catalan number[18] 208,335 – the largest number to be both triangular and square pyramidal 208,495 – Kaprekar number[15] 221,760 – highly composite number[6] 222,222 – repdigit 237,510 – harmonic divisor number[4] 241,920 – highly totient number[3] 242,060 – harmonic divisor number[4] 248,832 – 125, the smallest fifth power that can be represented as the sum of only 6 fifth powers 261,119 – Carol number[19] 262,144 – 218; exponential factorial of 4;[20] a superperfect number[21] 262,468 – Leyland number[13] 263,167 – Kynea number[22] 268,705 – Leyland number[13] 274,177 – prime factor of F6 277,200 – highly composite number[6] 279,936 – 67 280,859 – a six-digit prime number whose square (algebra) is tridigital. 293,547 – Wedderburn–Etherington number[11] 294,685 – Markov number[14] 298,320 – Keith number[9] 300,000 to 399,999 310,572 – Motzkin number[7] 317,811 – Fibonacci number[10] 318,682 – Kaprekar number[15] 326,981 – alternating factorial[23] 329,967 – Kaprekar number[15] 332,640 – highly composite number;[6] harmonic divisor number[4] 333,333 – repdigit 333,667 – sexy prime and unique prime[24] 333,673 – sexy prime 333,679 – sexy prime 351,351 – only known odd abundant number that is not the sum of some of its proper, nontrivial (i.e. >1) divisors (sequence A122036 in the OEIS). 351,352 – Kaprekar number[15] 355,419 – Keith number[9] 356,643 – Kaprekar number[15] 360,360 – harmonic divisor number;[4] the smallest number divisible by all of the numbers 1 through 15 362,880 – 9!, highly totient number[3] 370,261 – first prime followed by a prime gap of over 100 371,293 – 135, palindromic in base 12 (15AA5112) 389,305 – self-descriptive number in base 7 390,313 – Kaprekar number[15] 390,625 – 58 397,585 – Leyland number[13] 400,000 to 499,999 409,113 – sum of the first nine factorials 422,481 – smallest number whose fourth power is the sum of three smaller fourth powers 423,393 – Leyland number[13] 426,389 – Markov number[14] 426,569 – cyclic number in base 12 437,760 to 440,319 – any of these numbers will cause the Apple II+ and Apple //e computers to crash to a monitor prompt when entered at the Basic prompt, due to a short-cut in the Applesoft code programming of the overflow test when evaluating 16 bit numbers.[25] Entering 440000 at the prompt has been used to hack games that are protected against entering commands at the prompt after the game is loaded. 444,444 – repdigit 461,539 – Kaprekar number[15] 466,830 – Kaprekar number[15] 470,832 – Pell number[17] 483,840 – highly totient number[3] 498,960 – highly composite number[6] 499,393 – Markov number[14] 499,500 – Kaprekar number[15] 500,000 to 599,999 500,500 – Kaprekar number,[15] sum of first 1000 integers 509,203 – Riesel number[26] 510,510 – the product of the first seven prime numbers, thus the seventh primorial[27] 514,229 – Fibonacci prime,[28] Markov number[14] 524,287 – Mersenne prime[12] 524,288 – 219 524,649 – Leyland number[13] 531,441 – 312 533,169 – Leyland number[13] 533,170 – Kaprekar number[15] 537,824 – 145 539,400 – harmonic divisor number[4] 548,834 – equal to the sum of the sixth powers of its digits 554,400 – highly composite number[6] 555,555 – repdigit 600,000 to 699,999 604,800 – number of seconds in a week 646,018 – Markov number[14] 665,280 – highly composite number[6] 666,666 – repdigit 676,157 – Wedderburn–Etherington number[11] 678,570 – Bell number[8] 694,280 – Keith number[9] 695,520 – harmonic divisor number[4] 700,000 to 799,999 720,720 – superior highly composite number;[29] colossally abundant number;[30] the smallest number divisible by all the numbers 1 through 16 725,760 – highly totient number[3] 726,180 – harmonic divisor number[4] 742,900 – Catalan number[18] 753,480 – harmonic divisor number[4] 759,375 – 155 765,623 – emirp, Friedman number 56 × 72 ? 6 ÷ 3 777,777 – repdigit, smallest natural number requiring 20 syllables in American English, 22 in British English 800,000 to 899,999 823,543 – 77 832,040 – Fibonacci number[10] 853,467 – Motzkin number[7] 873,612 – 11 + 22 + 33 + 44 + 55 + 66 + 77 888,888 – repdigit 890,625 – 1-automorphic number[5] 900,000 to 999,999 909,091 – unique prime 925,765 – Markov number[14] 925,993 – Keith number[9] 950,976 – harmonic divisor number[4] 967,680 – highly totient number[3] 999,983 – largest 6-digit prime number 999,999 – repdigit. Rational numbers with denominators 7 and 13 have 6-digit repetends when expressed in decimal form, because 999999 is divisible by 7 and by 13. References Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003617 (Smallest n-digit prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 7 September 2017. "Problem of the Month (August 2000)". Archived from the original on 2012-12-18. Retrieved 2013-01-13. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A097942 (Highly totient numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001599 (Harmonic or Ore numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003226 (Automorphic numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2019-04-06. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002182 (Highly composite numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001006 (Motzkin numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000110 (Bell or exponential numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A007629 (Repfigit (REPetitive FIbonacci-like diGIT) numbers (or Keith numbers)access-date=2016-06-17)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000045 (Fibonacci numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001190 (Wedderburn-Etherington numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000668 (Mersenne primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A076980 (Leyland numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002559 (Markoff (or Markov) numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006886 (Kaprekar numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000979 (Wagstaff primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000129 (Pell numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000108 (Catalan numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. "Sloane's A093112 : a(n) = (2^n-1)^2 - 2". Archived from the original on 2016-06-23. Retrieved 2016-06-17. "Sloane's A049384 : a(0)=1, a(n+1) = (n+1)^a(n)access-date=2016-06-17". Archived from the original on 2016-05-26. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A019279 (Superperfect numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. "Sloane's A093069 : a(n) = (2^n + 1)^2 - 2". Archived from the original on 2016-08-05. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005165 (Alternating factorials)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A040017 (Unique period primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-15. Retrieved 2016-04-04. Disassembled ROM. See comments at $DA1E. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A101036 (Riesel numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002110 (Primorial numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005478 (Prime Fibonacci numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002201 (Superior highly composite numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A004490 (Colossally abundant numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-17. vte Large numbers Examples in numerical order Thousand Ten thousand Hundred thousand Million Ten million Hundred million Billion Trillion Quadrillion Quintillion Sextillion Septillion Octillion Nonillion Decillion Googol Googolplex Skewes's number Googolduplex Moser's number Graham's number TREE(3) SSCG(3) Rayo's number Transfinite numbers Expression methods Notations Scientific notation Knuth's up-arrow notation Conway chained arrow notation Steinhaus–Moser notation Operators Hyperoperation Tetration Pentation Ackermann function Bowers's operators Grzegorczyk hierarchy Related articles (alphabetical order) Extended real number line Gigantic prime Indefinite and fictitious numbers Infinitesimal Largest known prime number List of numbers Long and short scales Number systems Number names Orders of magnitude Power of two Power of 10 Sagan Unit Titanic prime Names History Categories: Integers Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inArticleTalkReadEditView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page In other projects Wikimedia Commons Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages ??????? Español Français ?????? ??????? ??? ???? ?????? ?? 23 more Edit links This page was last edited on 18 June 2019, at 12:01 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimed

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The species typically grows in dense clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). In young specimens, the cap surface is coated with a fine layer of reflective mica-like cells, inspiring the species name as well as the common names "mica cap", "shiny cap", and "glistening inky cap". A few hours after collection, the gills will start to dissolve into a black, inky, spore-laden liquid. The fruit bodies are edible before the gills blacken and dissolve, and cooking will stop the process. Chemical analysis of the fruit bodies has revealed the presence of antibacterial and enzyme-inhibiting compounds. (Full article...) Recently featured: 1907 Tiflis bank robbery Raymond Leane Shergar Archive By email More featured articles Did you know... Trinity plantation and aqueduct Trinity plantation and aqueduct ... that an aqueduct (pictured) of over 1 mi (1.6 km) in length was built to supply Trinity plantation in Jamaica with water? ... that Hu Jinqing's animated film The Fight Between the Snipe and the Clam, based on a Chinese proverb, won a Silver Bear in Berlin? ... that the ripe seed pods of Brachystegia eurycoma burst explosively and throw out the large disc-shaped seeds? ... that a Mexican mayor warned that the murder of suspected drug lord Rolando López Salinas would increase drug violence in his city? ... that the 15th-century Short English Chronicle described King Edward IV as receiving instantaneous notification of treason from God? ... that motorsport official Silvia Bellot was part of the first all-woman panel of stewards in the history of the World Rally Championship at the 2016 Rally Catalunya? ... that Meghan Trainor's song "All the Ways" was inspired by a conversation she had with her husband Daryl Sabara? ... that a podcast helped overturn the murder conviction of Kaj Linna after he had been imprisoned for thirteen years? Archive Start a new article Nominate an article In the news Se'are Mekonnen Se'are Mekonnen The Italian cities of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo are chosen as the joint hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics. In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, regional president Ambachew Mekonnen and national-military chief of staff Se'are Mekonnen (pictured) are assassinated. At least 184 people are killed during a heat wave in India. Former President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi dies during his trial, at the age of 67. Ongoing: Cricket World Cup FIFA Women's World Cup Hong Kong protests Recent deaths: Etika Iván Er?d Dave Bartholomew Roger Béteille Eddie Garcia Peng Xiaolian Nominate an article On this day June 27 Jesus College, Oxford Jesus College, Oxford 1571 – Elizabeth I of England issued a royal charter establishing Jesus College (pictured), the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford. 1869 – One day after surrendering at the Battle of Hakodate, Enomoto Takeaki turned over Gory?kaku to Japanese forces, signaling the collapse of the Republic of Ezo. 1905 – The crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin began a mutiny against their oppressive officers. 1989 – The International Labour Organization Convention 169, a major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples, and a forerunner of the 2007 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted. Conan I of Rennes (d. 992) · Frank Rattray Lillie (b. 1870) · Mary McAleese (b. 1951) More anniversaries: June 26 June 27 June 28 Archive By email List of historical anniversaries Today's featured picture Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to physicist Wilhelm Röntgen for the discovery of X-rays. The award, administered by the Nobel Foundation, is widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death. A total of 209 individuals have been awarded the prize. This picture shows the diploma for the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded in December 1903 to Pierre and Marie Curie, as well as Henri Becquerel, whose name is mentioned on the second page of the document. Diploma credit: Sofia Gisberg; restored by Jebulon Recently featured: Glacier Point Royal Mail Polar bear Archive More featured pictures Other areas of Wikipedia Community portal – Bulletin board, projects, resources and activities covering a wide range of Wikipedia areas. Help desk – Ask questions about using Wikipedia. Local embassy – For Wikipedia-related communication in languages other than English. Reference desk – Serving as virtual librarians, Wikipedia volunteers tackle your questions on a wide range of subjects. Site news – Announcements, updates, articles and press releases on Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation. Village pump – For discussions about Wikipedia itself, including areas for technical issues and policies. Wikipedia's sister projects Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects: Commons Commons Free media repository MediaWiki MediaWiki Wiki software development Meta-Wiki Meta-Wiki Wikimedia project coordination Wikibooks Wikibooks Free textbooks and manuals Wikidata Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikinews Wikinews Free-content news Wikiquote Wikiquote Collection of quotations Wikisource Wikisource Free-content library Wikispecies Wikispecies Directory of species Wikiversity Wikiversity Free learning materials and activities Wikivoyage Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Wiktionary Dictionary and thesaurus Wikipedia languages This Wikipedia is written in English. Started in 2001, it currently contains 5,877,863 articles. Many other Wikipedias are available; some of the largest are listed below. More than 1,000,000 articles: Deutsch Español Français Italiano Nederlands ??? Polski Português ??????? 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Simple English Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ?????? / srpski Srpskohrvatski / ?????????????? Suomi Svenska ??? Türkçe ?????????? Ti?ng Vi?t ?? Complete list Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The species typically grows in dense clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). In young specimens, the cap surface is coated with a fine layer of reflective mica-like cells, inspiring the species name as well as the common names "mica cap", "shiny cap", and "glistening inky cap". A few hours after collection, the gills will start to dissolve into a black, inky, spore-laden liquid. The fruit bodies are edible before the gills blacken and dissolve, and cooking will stop the process. Chemical analysis of the fruit bodies has revealed the presence of antibacterial and enzyme-inhibiting compounds. (Full article...) Recently featured: 1907 Tiflis bank robbery Raymond Leane Shergar Archive By email More featured articles Did you know... Trinity plantation and aqueduct Trinity plantation and aqueduct ... that an aqueduct (pictured) of over 1 mi (1.6 km) in length was built to supply Trinity plantation in Jamaica with water? ... that Hu Jinqing's animated film The Fight Between the Snipe and the Clam, based on a Chinese proverb, won a Silver Bear in Berlin? ... that the ripe seed pods of Brachystegia eurycoma burst explosively and throw out the large disc-shaped seeds? ... that a Mexican mayor warned that the murder of suspected drug lord Rolando López Salinas would increase drug violence in his city? ... that the 15th-century Short English Chronicle described King Edward IV as receiving instantaneous notification of treason from God? ... that motorsport official Silvia Bellot was part of the first all-woman panel of stewards in the history of the World Rally Championship at the 2016 Rally Catalunya? ... that Meghan Trainor's song "All the Ways" was inspired by a conversation she had with her husband Daryl Sabara? ... that a podcast helped overturn the murder conviction of Kaj Linna after he had been imprisoned for thirteen years? Archive Start a new article Nominate an article In the news Se'are Mekonnen Se'are Mekonnen The Italian cities of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo are chosen as the joint hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics. In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, regional president Ambachew Mekonnen and national-military chief of staff Se'are Mekonnen (pictured) are assassinated. At least 184 people are killed during a heat wave in India. Former President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi dies during his trial, at the age of 67. Ongoing: Cricket World Cup FIFA Women's World Cup Hong Kong protests Recent deaths: Etika Iván Er?d Dave Bartholomew Roger Béteille Eddie Garcia Peng Xiaolian Nominate an article On this day June 27 Jesus College, Oxford Jesus College, Oxford 1571 – Elizabeth I of England issued a royal charter establishing Jesus College (pictured), the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford. 1869 – One day after surrendering at the Battle of Hakodate, Enomoto Takeaki turned over Gory?kaku to Japanese forces, signaling the collapse of the Republic of Ezo. 1905 – The crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin began a mutiny against their oppressive officers. 1989 – The International Labour Organization Convention 169, a major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples, and a forerunner of the 2007 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted. Conan I of Rennes (d. 992) · Frank Rattray Lillie (b. 1870) · Mary McAleese (b. 1951) More anniversaries: June 26 June 27 June 28 Archive By email List of historical anniversaries Today's featured picture Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to physicist Wilhelm Röntgen for the discovery of X-rays. The award, administered by the Nobel Foundation, is widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death. A total of 209 individuals have been awarded the prize. This picture shows the diploma for the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded in December 1903 to Pierre and Marie Curie, as well as Henri Becquerel, whose name is mentioned on the second page of the document. Diploma credit: Sofia Gisberg; restored by Jebulon Recently featured: Glacier Point Royal Mail Polar bear Archive More featured pictures Other areas of Wikipedia Community portal – Bulletin board, projects, resources and activities covering a wide range of Wikipedia areas. Help desk – Ask questions about using Wikipedia. Local embassy – For Wikipedia-related communication in languages other than English. Reference desk – Serving as virtual librarians, Wikipedia volunteers tackle your questions on a wide range of subjects. Site news – Announcements, updates, articles and press releases on Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation. Village pump – For discussions about Wikipedia itself, including areas for technical issues and policies. Wikipedia's sister projects Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects: Commons Commons Free media repository MediaWiki MediaWiki Wiki software development Meta-Wiki Meta-Wiki Wikimedia project coordination Wikibooks Wikibooks Free textbooks and manuals Wikidata Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikinews Wikinews Free-content news Wikiquote Wikiquote Collection of quotations Wikisource Wikisource Free-content library Wikispecies Wikispecies Directory of species Wikiversity Wikiversity Free learning materials and activities Wikivoyage Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Wiktionary Dictionary and thesaurus Wikipedia languages This Wikipedia is written in English. Started in 2001, it currently contains 5,877,863 articles. Many other Wikipedias are available; some of the largest are listed below. More than 1,000,000 articles: Deutsch Español Français Italiano Nederlands ??? Polski Português ??????? Svenska Ti?ng Vi?t ?? More than 250,000 articles: ??????? Bahasa Indonesia Bahasa Melayu ????????? Català ?eština Esperanto Euskara ????? ??? Magyar Norsk Bokmål Român? Srpski Srpskohrvatski Suomi Türkçe ?????????? More than 50,000 articles: Bosanski Dansk Eesti ???????? English (simple form) Galego ????? Hrvatski Latviešu Lietuvi? ?????? Norsk nynorsk Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ??? Complete list of Wikipedias Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inMain PageTalkReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item In other projects Wikimedia Commons MediaWiki Meta-Wiki Wikispecies Wikibooks Wikidata Wikimania Wikinews Wikiquote Wikisource Wikiversity Wikivoyage Wiktionary Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages ??????? ????????? Bosanski Català ?eština Dansk Deutsch Eesti ???????? Español Esperanto Euskara ????? Français Galego ??? Hrvatski Bahasa Indonesia Italiano ????? ??????? Latviešu Lietuvi? Magyar Bahasa Melayu Nederlands ??? Norsk Norsk nynorsk Polski Português Român? ??????? Simple English Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ?????? / srpski Srpskohrvatski / ?????????????? Suomi Svenska ??? Türkçe ?????????? Ti?ng Vi?t ?? Complete list Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The species typically grows in dense clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). In young specimens, the cap surface is coated with a fine layer of reflective mica-like cells, inspiring the species name as well as the common names "mica cap", "shiny cap", and "glistening inky cap". A few hours after collection, the gills will start to dissolve into a black, inky, spore-laden liquid. The fruit bodies are edible before the gills blacken and dissolve, and cooking will stop the process. Chemical analysis of the fruit bodies has revealed the presence of antibacterial and enzyme-inhibiting compounds. (Full article...) Recently featured: 1907 Tiflis bank robbery Raymond Leane Shergar Archive By email More featured articles Did you know... Trinity plantation and aqueduct Trinity plantation and aqueduct ... that an aqueduct (pictured) of over 1 mi (1.6 km) in length was built to supply Trinity plantation in Jamaica with water? ... that Hu Jinqing's animated film The Fight Between the Snipe and the Clam, based on a Chinese proverb, won a Silver Bear in Berlin? ... that the ripe seed pods of Brachystegia eurycoma burst explosively and throw out the large disc-shaped seeds? ... that a Mexican mayor warned that the murder of suspected drug lord Rolando López Salinas would increase drug violence in his city? ... that the 15th-century Short English Chronicle described King Edward IV as receiving instantaneous notification of treason from God? ... that motorsport official Silvia Bellot was part of the first all-woman panel of stewards in the history of the World Rally Championship at the 2016 Rally Catalunya? ... that Meghan Trainor's song "All the Ways" was inspired by a conversation she had with her husband Daryl Sabara? ... that a podcast helped overturn the murder conviction of Kaj Linna after he had been imprisoned for thirteen years? Archive Start a new article Nominate an article In the news Se'are Mekonnen Se'are Mekonnen The Italian cities of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo are chosen as the joint hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics. In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, regional president Ambachew Mekonnen and national-military chief of staff Se'are Mekonnen (pictured) are assassinated. At least 184 people are killed during a heat wave in India. Former President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi dies during his trial, at the age of 67. Ongoing: Cricket World Cup FIFA Women's World Cup Hong Kong protests Recent deaths: Etika Iván Er?d Dave Bartholomew Roger Béteille Eddie Garcia Peng Xiaolian Nominate an article On this day June 27 Jesus College, Oxford Jesus College, Oxford 1571 – Elizabeth I of England issued a royal charter establishing Jesus College (pictured), the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford. 1869 – One day after surrendering at the Battle of Hakodate, Enomoto Takeaki turned over Gory?kaku to Japanese forces, signaling the collapse of the Republic of Ezo. 1905 – The crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin began a mutiny against their oppressive officers. 1989 – The International Labour Organization Convention 169, a major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples, and a forerunner of the 2007 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted. Conan I of Rennes (d. 992) · Frank Rattray Lillie (b. 1870) · Mary McAleese (b. 1951) More anniversaries: June 26 June 27 June 28 Archive By email List of historical anniversaries Today's featured picture Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to physicist Wilhelm Röntgen for the discovery of X-rays. The award, administered by the Nobel Foundation, is widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death. A total of 209 individuals have been awarded the prize. This picture shows the diploma for the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded in December 1903 to Pierre and Marie Curie, as well as Henri Becquerel, whose name is mentioned on the second page of the document. Diploma credit: Sofia Gisberg; restored by Jebulon Recently featured: Glacier Point Royal Mail Polar bear Archive More featured pictures Other areas of Wikipedia Community portal – Bulletin board, projects, resources and activities covering a wide range of Wikipedia areas. Help desk – Ask questions about using Wikipedia. Local embassy – For Wikipedia-related communication in languages other than English. Reference desk – Serving as virtual librarians, Wikipedia volunteers tackle your questions on a wide range of subjects. Site news – Announcements, updates, articles and press releases on Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation. Village pump – For discussions about Wikipedia itself, including areas for technical issues and policies. Wikipedia's sister projects Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects: Commons Commons Free media repository MediaWiki MediaWiki Wiki software development Meta-Wiki Meta-Wiki Wikimedia project coordination Wikibooks Wikibooks Free textbooks and manuals Wikidata Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikinews Wikinews Free-content news Wikiquote Wikiquote Collection of quotations Wikisource Wikisource Free-content library Wikispecies Wikispecies Directory of species Wikiversity Wikiversity Free learning materials and activities Wikivoyage Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Wiktionary Dictionary and thesaurus Wikipedia languages This Wikipedia is written in English. Started in 2001, it currently contains 5,877,863 articles. Many other Wikipedias are available; some of the largest are listed below. More than 1,000,000 articles: Deutsch Español Français Italiano Nederlands ??? Polski Português ??????? Svenska Ti?ng Vi?t ?? More than 250,000 articles: ??????? Bahasa Indonesia Bahasa Melayu ????????? Català ?eština Esperanto Euskara ????? ??? Magyar Norsk Bokmål Român? Srpski Srpskohrvatski Suomi Türkçe ?????????? More than 50,000 articles: Bosanski Dansk Eesti ???????? English (simple form) Galego ????? Hrvatski Latviešu Lietuvi? ?????? Norsk nynorsk Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ??? Complete list of Wikipedias Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inMain PageTalkReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item In other projects Wikimedia Commons MediaWiki Meta-Wiki Wikispecies Wikibooks Wikidata Wikimania Wikinews Wikiquote Wikisource Wikiversity Wikivoyage Wiktionary Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages ??????? ????????? Bosanski Català ?eština Dansk Deutsch Eesti ???????? Español Esperanto Euskara ????? Français Galego ??? Hrvatski Bahasa Indonesia Italiano ????? ??????? Latviešu Lietuvi? Magyar Bahasa Melayu Nederlands ??? Norsk Norsk nynorsk Polski Português Român? ??????? Simple English Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ?????? / srpski Srpskohrvatski / ?????????????? Suomi Svenska ??? Türkçe ?????????? Ti?ng Vi?t ?? Complete list Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The species typically grows in dense clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). In young specimens, the cap surface is coated with a fine layer of reflective mica-like cells, inspiring the species name as well as the common names "mica cap", "shiny cap", and "glistening inky cap". A few hours after collection, the gills will start to dissolve into a black, inky, spore-laden liquid. The fruit bodies are edible before the gills blacken and dissolve, and cooking will stop the process. Chemical analysis of the fruit bodies has revealed the presence of antibacterial and enzyme-inhibiting compounds. (Full article...) Recently featured: 1907 Tiflis bank robbery Raymond Leane Shergar Archive By email More featured articles Did you know... Trinity plantation and aqueduct Trinity plantation and aqueduct ... that an aqueduct (pictured) of over 1 mi (1.6 km) in length was built to supply Trinity plantation in Jamaica with water? ... that Hu Jinqing's animated film The Fight Between the Snipe and the Clam, based on a Chinese proverb, won a Silver Bear in Berlin? ... that the ripe seed pods of Brachystegia eurycoma burst explosively and throw out the large disc-shaped seeds? ... that a Mexican mayor warned that the murder of suspected drug lord Rolando López Salinas would increase drug violence in his city? ... that the 15th-century Short English Chronicle described King Edward IV as receiving instantaneous notification of treason from God? ... that motorsport official Silvia Bellot was part of the first all-woman panel of stewards in the history of the World Rally Championship at the 2016 Rally Catalunya? ... that Meghan Trainor's song "All the Ways" was inspired by a conversation she had with her husband Daryl Sabara? ... that a podcast helped overturn the murder conviction of Kaj Linna after he had been imprisoned for thirteen years? Archive Start a new article Nominate an article In the news Se'are Mekonnen Se'are Mekonnen The Italian cities of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo are chosen as the joint hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics. In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, regional president Ambachew Mekonnen and national-military chief of staff Se'are Mekonnen (pictured) are assassinated. At least 184 people are killed during a heat wave in India. Former President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi dies during his trial, at the age of 67. Ongoing: Cricket World Cup FIFA Women's World Cup Hong Kong protests Recent deaths: Etika Iván Er?d Dave Bartholomew Roger Béteille Eddie Garcia Peng Xiaolian Nominate an article On this day June 27 Jesus College, Oxford Jesus College, Oxford 1571 – Elizabeth I of England issued a royal charter establishing Jesus College (pictured), the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford. 1869 – One day after surrendering at the Battle of Hakodate, Enomoto Takeaki turned over Gory?kaku to Japanese forces, signaling the collapse of the Republic of Ezo. 1905 – The crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin began a mutiny against their oppressive officers. 1989 – The International Labour Organization Convention 169, a major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples, and a forerunner of the 2007 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted. Conan I of Rennes (d. 992) · Frank Rattray Lillie (b. 1870) · Mary McAleese (b. 1951) More anniversaries: June 26 June 27 June 28 Archive By email List of historical anniversaries Today's featured picture Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to physicist Wilhelm Röntgen for the discovery of X-rays. The award, administered by the Nobel Foundation, is widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death. A total of 209 individuals have been awarded the prize. This picture shows the diploma for the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded in December 1903 to Pierre and Marie Curie, as well as Henri Becquerel, whose name is mentioned on the second page of the document. Diploma credit: Sofia Gisberg; restored by Jebulon Recently featured: Glacier Point Royal Mail Polar bear Archive More featured pictures Other areas of Wikipedia Community portal – Bulletin board, projects, resources and activities covering a wide range of Wikipedia areas. Help desk – Ask questions about using Wikipedia. Local embassy – For Wikipedia-related communication in languages other than English. Reference desk – Serving as virtual librarians, Wikipedia volunteers tackle your questions on a wide range of subjects. Site news – Announcements, updates, articles and press releases on Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation. Village pump – For discussions about Wikipedia itself, including areas for technical issues and policies. Wikipedia's sister projects Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects: Commons Commons Free media repository MediaWiki MediaWiki Wiki software development Meta-Wiki Meta-Wiki Wikimedia project coordination Wikibooks Wikibooks Free textbooks and manuals Wikidata Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikinews Wikinews Free-content news Wikiquote Wikiquote Collection of quotations Wikisource Wikisource Free-content library Wikispecies Wikispecies Directory of species Wikiversity Wikiversity Free learning materials and activities Wikivoyage Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Wiktionary Dictionary and thesaurus Wikipedia languages This Wikipedia is written in English. Started in 2001, it currently contains 5,877,863 articles. Many other Wikipedias are available; some of the largest are listed below. More than 1,000,000 articles: Deutsch Español Français Italiano Nederlands ??? Polski Português ??????? Svenska Ti?ng Vi?t ?? More than 250,000 articles: ??????? Bahasa Indonesia Bahasa Melayu ????????? Català ?eština Esperanto Euskara ????? ??? Magyar Norsk Bokmål Român? Srpski Srpskohrvatski Suomi Türkçe ?????????? More than 50,000 articles: Bosanski Dansk Eesti ???????? English (simple form) Galego ????? Hrvatski Latviešu Lietuvi? ?????? Norsk nynorsk Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ??? Complete list of Wikipedias Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inMain PageTalkReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item In other projects Wikimedia Commons MediaWiki Meta-Wiki Wikispecies Wikibooks Wikidata Wikimania Wikinews Wikiquote Wikisource Wikiversity Wikivoyage Wiktionary Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version Languages ??????? ????????? Bosanski Català ?eština Dansk Deutsch Eesti ???????? Español Esperanto Euskara ????? Français Galego ??? Hrvatski Bahasa Indonesia Italiano ????? ??????? Latviešu Lietuvi? Magyar Bahasa Melayu Nederlands ??? Norsk Norsk nynorsk Polski Português Român? ??????? Simple English Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ?????? / srpski Srpskohrvatski / ?????????????? Suomi Svenska ??? Türkçe ?????????? Ti?ng Vi?t ?? Complete list Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The species typically grows in dense clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). In young specimens, the cap surface is coated with a fine layer of reflective mica-like cells, inspiring the species name as well as the common names "mica cap", "shiny cap", and "glistening inky cap". A few hours after collection, the gills will start to dissolve into a black, inky, spore-laden liquid. The fruit bodies are edible before the gills blacken and dissolve, and cooking will stop the process. Chemical analysis of the fruit bodies has revealed the presence of antibacterial and enzyme-inhibiting compounds. (Full article...) Recently featured: 1907 Tiflis bank robbery Raymond Leane Shergar Archive By email More featured articles Did you know... Trinity plantation and aqueduct Trinity plantation and aqueduct ... that an aqueduct (pictured) of over 1 mi (1.6 km) in length was built to supply Trinity plantation in Jamaica with water? ... that Hu Jinqing's animated film The Fight Between the Snipe and the Clam, based on a Chinese proverb, won a Silver Bear in Berlin? ... that the ripe seed pods of Brachystegia eurycoma burst explosively and throw out the large disc-shaped seeds? ... that a Mexican mayor warned that the murder of suspected drug lord Rolando López Salinas would increase drug violence in his city? ... that the 15th-century Short English Chronicle described King Edward IV as receiving instantaneous notification of treason from God? ... that motorsport official Silvia Bellot was part of the first all-woman panel of stewards in the history of the World Rally Championship at the 2016 Rally Catalunya? ... that Meghan Trainor's song "All the Ways" was inspired by a conversation she had with her husband Daryl Sabara? ... that a podcast helped overturn the murder conviction of Kaj Linna after he had been imprisoned for thirteen years? Archive Start a new article Nominate an article In the news Se'are Mekonnen Se'are Mekonnen The Italian cities of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo are chosen as the joint hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics. In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, regional president Ambachew Mekonnen and national-military chief of staff Se'are Mekonnen (pictured) are assassinated. At least 184 people are killed during a heat wave in India. Former President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi dies during his trial, at the age of 67. Ongoing: Cricket World Cup FIFA Women's World Cup Hong Kong protests Recent deaths: Etika Iván Er?d Dave Bartholomew Roger Béteille Eddie Garcia Peng Xiaolian Nominate an article On this day June 27 Jesus College, Oxford Jesus College, Oxford 1571 – Elizabeth I of England issued a royal charter establishing Jesus College (pictured), the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford. 1869 – One day after surrendering at the Battle of Hakodate, Enomoto Takeaki turned over Gory?kaku to Japanese forces, signaling the collapse of the Republic of Ezo. 1905 – The crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin began a mutiny against their oppressive officers. 1989 – The International Labour Organization Convention 169, a major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples, and a forerunner of the 2007 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted. Conan I of Rennes (d. 992) · Frank Rattray Lillie (b. 1870) · Mary McAleese (b. 1951) More anniversaries: June 26 June 27 June 28 Archive By email List of historical anniversaries Today's featured picture Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to physicist Wilhelm Röntgen for the discovery of X-rays. The award, administered by the Nobel Foundation, is widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death. A total of 209 individuals have been awarded the prize. This picture shows the diploma for the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded in December 1903 to Pierre and Marie Curie, as well as Henri Becquerel, whose name is mentioned on the second page of the document. Diploma credit: Sofia Gisberg; restored by Jebulon Recently featured: Glacier Point Royal Mail Polar bear Archive More featured pictures Other areas of Wikipedia Community portal – Bulletin board, projects, resources and activities covering a wide range of Wikipedia areas. Help desk – Ask questions about using Wikipedia. Local embassy – For Wikipedia-related communication in languages other than English. Reference desk – Serving as virtual librarians, Wikipedia volunteers tackle your questions on a wide range of subjects. Site news – Announcements, updates, articles and press releases on Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation. Village pump – For discussions about Wikipedia itself, including areas for technical issues and policies. Wikipedia's sister projects Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects: Commons Commons Free media repository MediaWiki MediaWiki Wiki software development Meta-Wiki Meta-Wiki Wikimedia project coordination Wikibooks Wikibooks Free textbooks and manuals Wikidata Wikidata Free knowledge base Wikinews Wikinews Free-content news Wikiquote Wikiquote Collection of quotations Wikisource Wikisource Free-content library Wikispecies Wikispecies Directory of species Wikiversity Wikiversity Free learning materials and activities Wikivoyage Wikivoyage Free travel guide Wiktionary Wiktionary Dictionary and thesaurus Wikipedia languages This Wikipedia is written in English. Started in 2001, it currently contains 5,877,863 articles. Many other Wikipedias are available; some of the largest are listed below. More than 1,000,000 articles: Deutsch Español Français Italiano Nederlands ??? Polski Português ??????? Svenska Ti?ng Vi?t ?? More than 250,000 articles: ??????? Bahasa Indonesia Bahasa Melayu ????????? Català ?eština Esperanto Euskara ????? ??? Magyar Norsk Bokmål Român? Srpski Srpskohrvatski Suomi Türkçe ?????????? More than 50,000 articles: Bosanski Dansk Eesti ???????? English (simple form) Galego ????? Hrvatski Latviešu Lietuvi? ?????? Norsk nynorsk Sloven?ina Slovenš?ina ??? Complete list of Wikipedias

S Smith

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

w('.')

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

fortnite

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

ewfgewfewfe

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

fewfewfew

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

ewfewfe

S Smith

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

ftjll

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

eefrewfwef

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

shaun

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

erg

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

regregreg

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

ergreger

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

gergerger

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

gergergregreg

L Green

27th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

wdffewfwfw

T Hatton

17th Jun 2019 Flag Comment

Spelt wrong!

M Sheikh

20th Apr 2019 Flag Comment

*Thx in advance

M Sheikh

20th Apr 2019 Flag Comment

super helpful website. Does anyone know of any other websites that are goof for interactive practice-preferably ones that you can log into and crate an account for yourself...

T Jennings

14th Mar 2019 Flag Comment

Yo wasson peng wam fam

K Emal

29th Jan 2019 Flag Comment

Dfm is cool.

K Emal

29th Jan 2019 Flag Comment

Love maths. Really do.

i hussain

23rd Dec 2018 Flag Comment

there are questions . it says DFMFullCoverage-AlgebraicFractions.pdf

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